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Posts Tagged ‘rider position’

A right foot trying to compensate for the weight sitting on my heels

I’m unbalanced. Now I know my friends are laughing in their sleeves, but I’m not talking about my mind, I’m talking about my body. No, I’m not bent over – yet; but, I put all my weight on my heels with the end result that my feet fly out from under me at the drop of a hat. My body developed a nice compensation. Without consulting me, my right foot started to turn out to help stabilize me.  Well, it’s not really the foot; it’s the foot, ankle, calf, knee and hip.

Because my imbalance affects me in my everyday life I’m a bit more aware than most of how this imbalance also affects my horse. How is he supposed to slug through the mud and keep both of us safe when I’m flapping back and forth? When I did dressage I was always appreciative that my mare would perform so well with a Weeble wobbling in the saddle. And that twist of the foot and hip sure doesn’t load both sides of the saddle evenly. Ouch, poor horsey’s back.

We whip out the checkbook to pay a trainer, clinician and vet to find out why our horse isn’t performing at its peak or why it has suddenly become unsound. But how many of us ask- “is it me?”  How can we ask our horses to go exert themselves to the max when they are also trying to compensate for us? And compensate they do. Sometimes they work so hard in our behalf that they make themselves lame. Here’s a video that shows a cutting horse with a novice rider- so don’t be negative on the rider, just think about how his movements would affect the horse long-term. This is an extreme example, but we are all doing stuff like this daily and don’t realize it. BTW, want a good seat, go work with cutting horses.

Now really, haven’t you ridden behind someone who was clearly leaning to the side of the saddle? What do you think that does to the horse’s back? How about the rider who falls forward after every jump, I’ll lay money down his horse is going to have shoulder problems in a couple of years. Or what could be causing the horse to always load the right shoulder, maybe it is the way the rider loads the back. I’m a “C” and it shows up in where my boys load their shoulders. And yet, I look pretty good to the outside eye. Only a trained eye on a tight tank top is going to see the telltale wrinkles of a sloped body.

We contort our bodies to emulate a “look” Back ridged, shoulders drawn behind, and heels exaggerated down. We let those arms flail like appendages instead of integrating them into the strength of our core. We suck in our stomachs and take away the strength of the diaphragm.

I don’t think we should apply the lash to ourselves, but we should attend to the problem. We should attend to ourselves just as earnestly as we attend to the training and development of our horse.  Spend some money on yourself instead of your vet.

Work with an Alexander Technique practitioner, learn tai chi (even the CDC is viewing it to help seniors learn balance) find a superb yoga instructor or work with an individual with a degree in human biomechanics or kinetics.  It like having your nails done, it feels great. It will help in your everyday life and your riding will improve by leaps and bounds. Your mount will be happier and most likely sounder as well. As they say in basketball –– nothing but net. Here’s a site that does a much better job of explaining then I can. http://www.physical-literacy.org/hollysweeney.htm

Take some time to learn the muscles in your own body and how they work. It may take a while to wake up your body, to be able to tune into yourself, but it will come.  Hey, there is even an app for that! We are fortunate that we are living in a time when there is a lot of research into how the body integrates itself, postural muscles versus strength and movement muscles, muscle fascia (becoming increasing acknowledged for its importance), and the flow of electrical impulses and fluid through the muscles, tendons and ligaments.

You may have to search for a while; there are a lot of “wannabees” out there. There are, however, a number of practitioners who have really studied the muscle system and the interrelation between the muscles, tendon and ligament groups.  We search for our horses, shouldn’t we search on behalf of ourselves.

I continue to work on my body mechanics and understanding how to properly use a group of muscles and how it affects the rest of my body structure. It is a never ending quest. But I can safely say at this point –– “Weebles wobble, but they don’t fall down.”

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